Rinky-Dinky Right Fights!

Apr 5, 2019 by

Rinky-Dinky Right Fights!

Rinky-Dinky Right Fights!

The biggest fight I ever had with my last husband was over the correct spelling of the word remuneration.

He had written the word as renumeration.  When I gently pointed out his error and smugly suggested that he look it up.  He refused.  He argued that he was right and I was wrong.  Could I leave it there?  Not on your life!  (Hopefully, I have evolved somewhat since then, but I am not totally sure.)

So I got out the Merriam-Webster’s, and began to read to him what it said, enunciating each letter with bold-faced emphasis.  His glare at me could have withered King Kong.  My wisdom and my loving and helpful correction was not welcomed, nor appreciated.  In fact, I realized that he felt diminished.  I was furious with myself as I realized what I had created.

One TV psychologist asks the question, “Do you want to be right or do you want to be loved?” My ego wants to know, “Why can’t I be both?

Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines rinky-dink as small-time, old fashioned.  For me, if something is rinky-dink, it is of little value, not worth much, insignificant.

The argument we had was rinky-dink.  Somewhere along the pathway to evolutionary enlightenment, it seems to me that we have to recognize what is important and modify our approach to harmonious living.

But, really, don’t you just love being right?  I know I have!  However, if my being right, even though I know I am, brings unnecessary pain to someone else, wouldn’t it be kinder to let it slide for a bit.  Unless it’s an earthshaking, life and death matter, could we not find another more respectful way to offer our brilliance to others?

I don’t want to be a rinky-dink person.  I want to release my need to correct others.  I choose to be bigger than my annoyance when I have a long wait at the doctor’s office.  I have what it takes to rise above the politics of the moment.

It all boils down, I think, to our instruction to love one another.  As we can begin to experience each person as beloved family members, when we can honor their pathways, when we can protect their dignity and celebrate their uniqueness, what a wonderful world we will have.

We, then, will move swiftly, easily, and joyously into a life of grace.  Let’s not wait for “then.” Let’s do it now!

I FORGIVE MYSELF COMPLETELY FOR PAST RINKY-DINKY BEHAVIORS.

TODAY I COMMIT TO LOVE AND ACCEPT EVERYONE JUST THE WAY THEY ARE AND JUST THE WAY THEY ARE NOT!

Edwene Gaines, P.O. Box 125,  Valley Head, AL  35989

Author of the books:

The Four Spiritual Laws of Prosperity

I Choose Forgiveness, Amazon Kindle

 

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3 Comments

  1. Sandy Pruitt

    I love this perspective! Thank you for sharing.

  2. Carmie

    Edwene you are always so spot on. I love this and you.

  3. “I don’t want to be a rinky-dink person.” This is so absolutely true! Thank you for your generous words, Edwene!

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